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FAQ: SRC Site Evaluation Program

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1. How does the SRC Site Evaluation Program work?

When you enroll in the SRC Site Evaluation Program, DOEE’s non-profit partner, the Center for Watershed Protection (CWP) will conduct a site evaluation to determine where on your site you have good opportunities to install GI.

Upon completing the SRC Site Evaluation Program, participants may choose to develop SRC-generating GI based on the GI concept design(s) developed by CWP. At this point, DOEE encourages participants to submit an SRC Price Lock Program application. Participation in the SRC Price Lock Program will allow the project to sell their SRCs to DOEE if they cannot find a seller on the market.

2. How many applications will be accepted? Is there an application deadline?

Applications will be reviewed as they are received as long as funding is available. While participants will not receive funding, DOEE expects to provide approximately $100,000 worth of assistance through this program. CWP will notify you of a decision within two weeks of your application.

3. How can the SRC Site Evaluation Program benefit nonprofits?

DOEE expects that the SRC Site Evaluation Program will make it easier to generate SRCs on land owned by non-profits including churches, cemeteries and schools. DOEE will prioritize funding for these projects.

4. Can I apply to the SRC Price Lock Program for GI identified through the SRC Site Evaluation Program?

Yes, participants who plan on constructing the GI identified through the SRC Site Evaluation Program are encouraged to participate in the SRC Price Lock Program. To participate, you must submit a separate SRC Price Lock Program application.

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5. Why is participation restricted to the MS4?

The Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) receives runoff from about 2/3 of the District. In the MS4 area, stormwater drains directly into waterbodies via overland flow or through a storm sewer, in most cases with no treatment. This makes GI especially important in areas served by the MS4, but DOEE estimates that a GI retrofit of the entire MS4 would cost over $7 billion.

In the Combined Sewer System (CSS), which receives runoff from about 1/3 of the District, rain can cause the sewer to overflow, dumping sewage mixed with stormwater directly into our waterbodies. Large tunnels are under construction to prevent overflow from the CSS and ensure that it is treated at the Blue Plains wastewater treatment plant before it is discharged.

6. Am I required to have secured funding to build GI identified through the SRC Site Evaluation Program prior to applying?

No, applicants are not required to have secured funding for GI construction. However, DOEE’s expectation is that participation in the SRC Site Evaluation Program and subsequent participation in the SRC Price Lock Program will assist property owners in identifying and securing funding sources.

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7. Will I be required to construct GI based on the concept designs developed through the SRC Site Evaluation Program?

No, participants are not required to construct GI concept designs. However, properties should not apply for the SRC Site Evaluation Program unless they have a serious interest in pursuing a GI project.

8. I own a site on which I am planning a large development or redevelopment project. Can I participate in the SRC Site Evaluation Program?

The SRC Site Evaluation Program cannot be used to develop GI designs to comply with regulatory requirements for a project triggering the District’s stormwater management regulations. For large properties where regulated projects are occurring (such as campuses), there may be other areas on the property that are eligible for an SRC Site Evaluation.

9. How detailed are the GI concept designs developed through the SRC Site Evaluation Program?

The GI concept designs will be a preliminary design that includes calculation of approximate storage volume, contributing drainage area, and GI area; development of plan view and cross section details; construction cost estimate, etc. They will provide enough detail to determine the feasibility of a proposed GI practice, but will not be complete construction plans. To proceed with construction, a licensed engineer will be needed to further develop the plans and submit a Stormwater Management Plan to DOEE for approval. During further design and construction, specific design elements may vary.

10. What is the difference between the SRC Site Evaluation Program and the SRC Aggregator Startup Grant program?

Both the SRC Site Evaluation Program and the SRC Aggregator Startup Grant Program identify opportunities to install Green Infrastructure (GI) that is eligible for participation in DOEE's SRC Price Lock Program.

The SRC Aggregator Startup Grant Program supports technical and outreach work by SRC businesses to identify GI opportunities on properties whose owners are interested in the financial and other benefits of SRC-generating GI. Property owners typically would not apply for an SRC Startup Grant. However, a property owner can contact an SRC business who is participating in the SRC Startup Grant program.

Property owners who want direct assistance identifying GI opportunities on their properties would apply for an SRC Site Evaluation. Businesses that would apply for an SRC Aggregator Startup Grant would not apply an SRC Site Evaluation.

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11. Is my project subject to the Limitations on SRC Generation by DOEE-Funded Stormwater Retention BMPs?

Participation in the SRC Site Evaluation Program does not mean that the project is considered DOEE-funded. These projects will not be subject to the limitations policy.

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